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Bibs or shorts: How do I know what is Helpful for me?

Bibs or shorts: How do I know what is Helpful for me?

If you are new to cycling, the decision to go with a bib or shorts can be a difficult one. Until recently, bibs were not as popular among female cyclists as the design of women's kits was still based on measurements of men's kits, which did not work for most women. Not only were the dimensions slightly off, but the design of the bib made it difficult for women to use the bathroom, making go-shorts for most female cyclists. Thankfully, the cycling apparel industry took notice and began making design changes to suit women's bodies and needs. Women's shorts and bibs are now generally being designed with a front glass to accommodate a longer waist and come with shorter leg lengths. A variety of bibs are also popping up in the market, each with innovative features that aim to make bib use easier for women. The "dropper bibs" are equipped with a feature (zippers, clips, etc.) that allows the user to disconnect the straps so that they can remove their bottles more easily, allowing almost air in the bathroom. Dropper bibs are still relatively new and come in a variety of styles, including open backs and halts.

 

If you are a roadie, or even an aspiring roadie, it is recommended that you stick with a bib or fitted bicycle shorts made of lycra. Even though the bib may sound silly, the pros that come with wearing the bib can outrank the opposition. It is worth noting that the biggest complaint about wearing Lycra shorts is that the elastic waistband may be a bit too chopped or cut into the skin, which is one of the most common reasons cyclists are shorts on the bib Make a big switch. This may not be a big deal, but aside from the usual inconvenience of having elastic cuts in your skin, a highly tight waistband can interfere with your ability to breathe. Getting a loose pair of riding shorts may seem like a logical idea, but then you slip the hassle of your riding shorts down. Such as restricted breathing and slipping shorts were not too bad, but many riders also complained that the elastic bands absorbed the sweat, causing tingling and soreness. Choosing a bib should eliminate all of the above problems because the bibs have no elastic waistband and the shoulder straps help securely hold the chamis (more on these later).

If you ride leisurely on your cruiser or come in relatively benign terrain and your ride is going to be relatively short, looser shorts would be a perfectly good option